Traffic management

Table of Contents

2.1 Prioritising Using the Movement and Place Framework

The Movement and Place Framework provides the basis for proactively managing the road network and encouraging road users to travel on the road type that best suits their chosen mode of travel (i.e. the right road for the right travel need).

Figure 2.4 through to Figure 2.7 show various movement and place strategies and where to focus priority in the Movement and Place Framework for various road users. For example to improve:

  1. road safety for all road users, focus needs to be on prioritising road safety across all road types and functions
  2. travel time for motor vehicles, the focus needs to be on prioritising their use for movement of vehicles
  3. connectivity and flow for pedestrians, the focus needs to be on prioritising their use as places rather than just used for moving vehicles
  4. loading and parking facilities for motor vehicles, the focus needs to be on prioritising their use as places and decreasing their use for moving vehicles
  5. facilities for pedestrians, focus needs to be on prioritising their use as primarily places.

Figure 2.4: Prioritising movements and places to improve road safety


Movement: Road safety

Place: Road safety

Source: Adapted from Transport for NSW (2016).

Figure 2.5: Prioritising movements to improve travel time (longer journeys) and travel time (reliability)


Movement: Travel time

Place: Travel time reliability

Source: Adapted from Transport for NSW (2016).

Figure 2.6: Prioritising movements to improve access to centres, loading and parking facilities and general facilities


Movement: Improve access to centres

Place: Improve loading and parking facilities

Place: Improve facilities

Place: Improve facilities

Source: Adapted from Transport for NSW (2016).

Figure 2.7: Prioritising movements to improve connectivity and flow, environment/facilities and environment


Movement: Improve connectivity and flow

Movement: Improve connectivity and flow


Movement: Improve environment/facilities

Place: Improve environment

Source: Adapted from Transport for NSW (2016).

The Movement and Place Framework provides a standardised framework in which road agencies can understand which user type should have which priority within a certain place. The priority may change by time of day as the role and primary purpose of place changes emphasis throughout the course of the day, for example established urban road networks where key ‘movement’ roads have major ‘place’ uses abutting the road (e.g. significant strip shopping centres). These locations create a need for balancing competing demands for movement and place by time of day and day of week. Table 2.1 outlines an example of a jurisdiction’s priorities for user types and places based on route type and time of day. Each jurisdiction would need to develop their own priorities through stakeholder engagement and consultation.

These priorities can then be assigned relative level of service (LOS) goals based on their relative priority as outlined in Table 2.2.

Table 2.1: VicRoads priorities for user types and places based on route type and time of day

Time of dayUser typePlace significance
Low
(e.g. residential or outside activity centre)
Moderate
(e.g. small to medium activity centre)
High
(e.g. large activity centre and key city destinations)
Very high
(e.g. Metropolitan activity centre and the expanded city centre)
AM peakBicycleStrongly encourageEncourageEncourageEncourage
AM peakBusStrongly encourageStrongly encourageEncourageEncourage
AM peakCarNo encouragementNo encouragementEncourage local access onlyEncourage local access only
AM peakPedestriansNo encouragementNo encouragementEncourageStrongly encourage
AM peakTramStrongly encourageStrongly encourageEncourageEncourage
High off-peakBicycleStrongly encourageEncourageEncourageEncourage
High off-peakBusStrongly encourageEncourageEncourageEncourage
High off-peakCarNo encouragementEncourage local access onlyEncourage local access onlyEncourage local access only
High off-peakPedestrianNo encouragementStrongly encourageStrongly encourageStrongly encourage
High off-peakTramStrongly encourageEncourageEncourageEncourage
Off-peakBicycleStrongly encourageEncourageEncourageEncourage
Off-peakBusStrongly encourageEncourageEncourageEncourage
Off-peakCarNo encouragementNo encouragementNo encouragementNo encouragement
Off-peakPedestrianNo encouragementNo encouragementEncourageEncourage
Off-peakTramStrongly encourageEncourageEncourageEncourage
PM peakBicycleStrongly encourageEncourageEncourageEncourage
PM peakBusStrongly encourageEncourageEncourageEncourage
PM peakCarNo encouragementNo encouragementEncourage local access onlyEncourage local access only
PM peakPedestrianNo encouragementEncourageStrongly encourageStrongly encourage
PM peakTramStrongly encourageEncourageEncourageEncourage

Source: VicRoads (personal communication 2015).

Table 2.2: Relative mobility LOS associated with relative priority

Relative priority (RP)Goal relative mobility LOS
Strongly encourageA
EncourageB
No specific encouragementC
Encourage local access onlyD
Local access onlyD-
No priorityE

Source: VicRoads (personal communication 2015).

A gap analysis can then be undertaken to compare the current measured LOS with the goal LOS using a tool such as the SmartRoads tool (further information on the SmartRoads tool can be found in Appendix A). The LOS can be measured using the framework referred to in Commentary 1 although currently the SmartRoads tool focuses on mobility and does not extend to the other four measures of safety, access, information and amenity. With a gap analysis undertaken road agencies can target which areas are worth increasing LOS in, while understanding the trade‑offs such actions will have for other road users. Such an approach enables agencies to target strategies that not only aim to achieve the desired LOS outcome for the specific user and LOS measure but minimise undesired degradation of LOS outcome for other users and/or other LOS measures.