Road safety

Cover of Development of a Best Practice Intervention Model for Recidivist Speeding Offenders
Development of a Best Practice Intervention Model for Recidivist Speeding Offenders
  • Publication no: AP-T134-09
  • ISBN: 978-1-921551-31-4
  • Published: 1 May 2009

Speed-related crashes are a continuing concern in Australasia. On behalf of Austroads, ARRB Group undertook to develop a framework for an intervention to promote safe driving among recidivist speeders.

Five key tasks were carried out: a literature review to investigate the scale and nature of speeding on the Australasian road network; an overview of key models of behaviour change; a literature review and consultations to identify interventions currently available for recidivist speeders; development of a best practice model that explores technological and behaviour change interventions, and how these should be applied to recidivist speeding offenders; the outlining of an appropriate method for the trial and evaluation of the proposed models. The most promising intervention option involves a combination of in-vehicle technology and driver education.

  • SUMMARY
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
    • 1.1. Background
    • 1.2. Project Scope
    • 1.3. Project Objectives
  • 2. METHOD
    • 2.1. Literature Review
    • 2.2. Consultation with Road Safety Practitioners
  • 3. OVERVIEW OF SPEED AS A ROAD SAFETY ISSUE
    • 3.1. What is Speeding?
    • 3.2. Speed and Risk
    • 3.3. The Extent of Speeding in Australia and New Zealand
  • 4. RECIDIVIST SPEEDERS
    • 4.1. Definitions of Recidivism in the Speeding Context
    • 4.2. Characteristics of Recidivist Speeders
    • 4.3. Subtypes of Speeder
    • 4.4. Implications of the Nature of Recidivists
  • 5. EDUCATIONAL APPROACHES
    • 5.1. Speed Awareness Scheme and its Predecessors
    • 5.2. The Televerket Road Safety Improvement Course
    • 5.3. Australian Examples
    • 5.4. Summary
  • 6. IN-VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY POSSIBILITIES FOR MANAGING SPEEDS
    • 6.1. Intelligent Speed Adaptation (ISA)
    • 6.2. Summary
  • 7. BEHAVIOUR CHANGE MODELS
    • 7.1. Health Belief Model
    • 7.2. The Theory of Planned Behaviour
    • 7.3. Social Cognitive Theory
    • 7.4. Other Behaviour Change Models, Overlap, and What is Important in the End
    • 7.5. A Communication Model
  • 8. TOWARDS A BEST PRACTICE MODEL
    • 8.1. Intervention Format
    • 8.2. Intervention delivery
    • 8.3. Course Aims and Monitoring and Evaluation
    • 8.4. Intervention Alignment with Best Practice
  • 9. HOW WOULD IT BE PILOTED?
    • 9.1. Outcome Evaluation Options for Different Types of Intervention
    • 9.2. Size of Trial
    • 9.3. Control and Comparison Groups
    • 9.4. Need for Random Assignment
    • 9.5. Process Evaluation
  • 10. CONCLUSIONS
  • REFERENCES
  • APPENDIX A CONSULTATION INTERVIEW SCHEDULE