Road safety

Cover of Safe System Demonstration Project Involving an Indigenous Community: Implementation
Safe System Demonstration Project Involving an Indigenous Community: Implementation
  • Publication no: AP-R429-13
  • ISBN: 978-1-921991-94-3
  • Published: 29 April 2013

This document reports on the implementation phase of the Indigenous Safe System Demonstration Project in Bidyadanga, Western Australia. In this phase a funding strategy was developed for the implementation plan which was prepared in the second half of 2011 and enacted during 2012.

Progress was made on the two priority issues: installing a pedestrian crossing at the main intersection; and reparation of fencing of an adjacent property to stop cattle wandering on the main highway and into the Community. An application was also submitted, and others are planned, to fund the implementation and evaluation of safe system initiatives including: supporting infrastructure upgrades; and education campaigns to address pedestrian safety, safe speeds and safe vehicles. This process has built capacity in the Community to identify future priorities and funding opportunities, and prepare funding applications.

Project challenges include changes in responsibility for a key road in the Community, staff turnovers and changes to funding scheme availability and applicability to the project, as well as a general lack of interest in the project at the local, state and national level. Communities seeking to conduct a similar initiative in their region should seek clear confirmation of responsibilities for roads, persevere with changing staffing turnovers and funding information, and anticipate that long delays can occur but should not be deemed as failures. Finding ‘champions’ in local agencies whose current work scope aligns with community needs is likely to be key to achieving sustainable safe system improvements.

While this project has focused on a remote Aboriginal community, the methods applied are intended to be replicable across Australia. Working in partnership with communities, road authorities and other supporting organisations, road safety priorities can be identified and implementation and funding strategies achieved. However, without improved cooperation between agencies on governance and sustained funding, ensuring the safe system approach to road safety extends to indigenous communities is unlikely to be realised. National coordination is likely to be needed to ensure best practice in road safety applies in all regions of Australia.

  • 1. SUMMARY
    • 1.1. Background
    • 1.2. Funding Strategy and 2012 Outcomes
    • 1.3. Project Challenges
    • 1.4. Concluding Comments
  • 2. BACKGROUND
  • 3. FUNDING STRATEGY AND 2012 OUTCOMES
    • 3.1. Progress on Community identified priorities
    • 3.2. Key funding submissions
    • 3.3. Community involvement and capacity building
    • 3.4. Future of the project
  • 4. PROJECT CHALLENGES
    • 4.1. Who has responsibility for road?
    • 4.2. Staff turnover
    • 4.3. Changing nature of grant programs
    • 4.4. Overarching challenges
  • 5. CONCLUDING COMMENTS
  • APPENDIX 1: APPROVED DESIGN PLANS FOR PEDESTRIAN CROSSING
  • INFORMATION RETRIEVAL