Road safety

Cover of Status report on the safety of light commercial vehicles
Status report on the safety of light commercial vehicles
  • Publication no: AP-R250-04
  • ISBN: 0 85588 699 4
  • Published: 19 April 2004
The aim of this investigation was to establish the safety record of light commercial vehicles (LCVs) relative to vehicles of other types. The accident analyses were based on national Fatality File data held by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) for five years (1992, 1994, 1996, 1997 and 1998); and road crash data held by New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland for between three and five years each. Exposure data was taken from the ABS Survey of Motor Vehicle Usage. The analyses revealed that after allowing for exposure in terms of number of registered vehicles and distance travelled, LCVs are not over-represented in fatal, injury or property damage crashes and do not pose a greater safety problem than other vehicle types. The crash involvement of LCVs has in many respects more in common with that of (light) passenger vehicles than with that of heavy vehicles (rigid trucks, buses and articulated vehicles). A number of distinguishing features of LCV crashes were also identified. It was clear that the majority of LCVs involved in fatal crashes were not being used for commercial purposes when the crash occurred. Any programs that may be initiated to address LCV crashes should not be resourced at the expense of programs aimed at other types of vehicle. Programs aimed at reducing the crash involvement of passenger vehicles are likely to be equally effective in reducing the crash involvement of LCVs. The focuses for LCVs, as for passenger vehicles, should be on speeding, driver impairment (especially by alcohol) and young drivers. Any programs to address LCV crashes should target male drivers, especially tradespeople, labourers and plant or machine operators, and drivers living in rural areas. However, any such programs should focus mainly on the use of LCVs for private purposes, such as commuting and trips to and from recreation activities, rather than on commercial use of these vehicles.
  • STATUS REPORT ON THE SAFETY OF LIGHT COMMERCIAL VEHICLES
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 2. FATAL CRASHES IN AUSTRALIA
  • 3. CRASHES IN SELECTED AUSTRALIAN STATES
  • 4. CRASH RATES ALLOWING FOR EXPOSURE
  • 5. SUMMARY OF RESULTS
  • 6. CONCLUSIONS
  • 7. COUNTERMEASURE IMPLICATIONS
  • APPENDIX A: NUMBER OF FATAL CRASHES BY MAKE AND MODEL OF SELECTED LIGHT COMMERCIAL VEHICLE BODY TYPES
  • APPENDIX B: NUMBER OF REGISTRED VEHICLES AND DISTANCE TRAVELLED BY VEHICLE TYPE
  • REFERENCES