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Cover of Productivity Implications of Heavy Vehicle Safety Programs
Productivity Implications of Heavy Vehicle Safety Programs
  • Publication no: AP-R263-05
  • ISBN: 0 85588 726 5
  • Published: 1 March 2005
The purpose of this project was to assess the productivity benefits achieved by companies as a result of improving the safety of their operations, particularly in relation to safer driving. The objectives were therefore to identify safety programs that may lead to changes in heavy vehicle operating costs, and to estimate the benefits or costs flowing to heavy vehicle operators of adopting road safety programs and practices. It was considered that the demonstration of a connection between productivity and heavy vehicle safety programs may lead to many more road transport companies adopting similar programs, with consequent benefits to both the companies and the community through reduced involvement of heavy vehicles in crashes. Extensive contact and consultation with companies yielded much qualitative data and some quantitative assessments of program benefits. It is therefore not possible to draw authoritative conclusions from the data collected. Nevertheless, the programs provided by the companies describe a range of initiatives and approaches that the companies believe have created a safer and more productive work place. In many cases the benefits claimed are subjective but in others the company has been able to provide estimates of savings in dollar terms or as a percentage of their overall costs. There is a considerable degree of similarity across some of the programs, particularly in relation to the benefits of employee selection, induction and training, and in relation to utilising employee knowledge and input to improve vehicle selection and maintenance. It is considered that the information in the report could provide a basis for encouraging other companies to see the benefits in adopting similar programs and initiatives. One of the known shortcomings among most operators that became apparent during the consultation is the lack of any structured before and after data collection. Whilst most have acknowledged this situation, every reasonable effort has been made to gather some meaningful measure of the
  • AP-R263/05 Productivity Implications of Heavy Vehicle Safety Programs
  • Austroads profile
  • Austroads membership
  • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
  • CONTENTS
  • 1. INTRODUCTION
  • 2. LITERATURE REVIEW
    • 2.1. General
    • 2.2. Summary of Review
    • 2.3. Literature by Subject Area
  • 3. COMPANY PROGRAMS, DATA IDENTIFICATION AND COLLECTION PROCESS
    • 3.1. Safety Programs Identified
    • 3.2. Summary of Program Elements
  • 4. CASE STUDIES OF HEAVY VEHICLE SAFETY PROGRAMS
    • 4.1. Company A – Driver Fatigue Management Program
    • 4.2. Company B – Fatigue Management & Regulatory Compliance
    • 4.3. Company C – Drivers’ Left Hand Blind Spot
    • 4.4. Company D – Driver Training and Key Performance Indicators (KPI)
    • 4.5. Company E – Driver Training, Fitness for Duty & HIQUE Reports
    • 4.6. Company F – Vehicle Fleet Management Program
    • 4.7. Company G – The Hidden Costs Measurement Program
    • 4.8. Company H – National Heavy Vehicle Accreditation Scheme (NHVAS)
    • 4.9. Company I – Driver Training, Induction and Lower Speed Rules
    • 4.10. Company J – Drug & Alcohol Random Testing & Training Programs
    • 4.11. Company K – Trucksafe Program
    • 4.12. Company L – 1. Fitness for Duty, 2. Employee Training, Induction & Performance Programs
  • 5. SUMMARY OF COMPANY PROGRAMS:
    • 5.1. General Comment on Surveyed Programs
    • 5.2. Common Program Features:
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY
  • APPENDIX 1 – NTC AND TRUCKSAFE PRESS RELEASES
  • Appendix 2 – Detailed Summary of Safety Programs
  • Appendix 3 – Company A: Basis for Fatigue Management Changes