Connected and automated vehicles

Cover of Examination of Major Policy Issues Relating to Introduction of Cooperative ITS to Australia
Examination of Major Policy Issues Relating to Introduction of Cooperative ITS to Australia
  • Publication no: AP-R383-11
  • ISBN: 978-1-921709-71-5
  • Published: 17 May 2011

The aims of this project are to provide decision-makers with broad advice to assist them in their policy decision-making on cooperative ITS by identifying and examining the main policy issues of cross-jurisdictional scope involved with the introduction and roll-out of cooperative Intelligent transport systems (cooperative ITS) in Australia, discussing these issues under two theoretical scenarios – a market-driven and a policy-driven approach – but recognising that the preferred approach is likely to be a combination of both, comparing the scenarios and drawing out policy actions that could maximise benefits to Australia from cooperative ITS and manage any risks effectively.

  • 1. INTRODUCTION
    • 1.1. Purpose and Scope
    • 1.2. Methodology
  • 2. COOPERATIVE ITS
    • 2.1. Definition and examples
    • 2.2. Private and Public Interests
    • 2.3. Benefit Drivers
      • 2.3.1. ITS Benefit Trends
      • 2.3.2. Benefit Drivers
  • 3. KEY POLICY CHALLENGES TO THE INTRODUCTION AND ROLL-OUT IN AUSTRALIA
    • 3.1. Dynamic and Uncertain Environment
      • 3.1.1. The Issues
      • 3.1.2. Overseas Experience
      • 3.1.3. Some Lessons for Australia
    • 3.2. Interoperability
      • 3.2.1. The Issues
      • 3.2.3. Some Lessons for Australia
    • 3.3. Functions, Responsibilities, Liabilities and Governance
      • 3.3.1. The Issues
      • 3.3.2. Overseas Experience
      • 3.3.3. Some Lessons for Australia
    • 3.4. Privacy and Security of Information – and Personal Security
      • 3.4.1. The Issues
      • 3.4.2. Overseas Experience
      • 3.4.3. Some Lessons for Australia
    • 3.5. Human-Machine Interface (HMI)
      • 3.5.1. The Issues
      • 3.5.2. Overseas Experience
      • 3.5.3. Some Lessons for Australia
    • 3.6. Digital Mapping and Positioning
      • 3.6.1. The Issues
      • 3.6.2. Overseas Experience
      • 3.6.3. Some Lessons for Australia
    • 3.7. Communications
      • 3.7.1. The Issues
      • 3.7.2. Overseas Experience
      • 3.7.3. Some Lessons for Australia
    • 3.8. Aftermarket Applications
      • 3.8.1. The Issues
      • 3.8.2. Overseas Experience
      • 3.8.3. Some Lessons for Australia
    • 3.9. Potential for Conflict Between Commercial Applications, Network Management and Good Practice Driving
      • 3.9.1. The Issues
      • 3.9.2. Overseas Experience
      • 3.9.3. Some Lessons for Australia
    • 3.10. Roadworthiness
    • 3.11. Building Consumer Confidence and Market Penetration
      • 3.11.1. The Issues
      • 3.11.2. Overseas Experience
      • 3.11.3. Some Lessons for Australia
  • 4. SUMMARY LESSONS FOR AUSTRALIA
    • 4.1. Early Structured Engagement of Key Stakeholders backed by Government and Private Sector Leadership
      • 4.1.1. Overseas Experience
      • 4.1.2. Current Australian Position
    • 4.2. Foundation Investment to Achieve Long-Term Interoperability and Avoid ad hoc Development
      • 4.2.1. Overseas Experience
      • 4.2.2. Current Australian Position
    • 4.3. Test Sites and Pilots
      • 4.3.1. Overseas Experience
      • 4.3.2. Current Australian Position
  • 5. SCENARIO ANALYSIS
    • 5.1. Market-Driven Approach
      • 5.1.1. Scenario Features
      • 5.1.2. Strategic-Level Actions and Consequences
    • 5.2. Policy-Driven Approach
      • 5.2.1. Scenario Features
      • 5.2.2. Strategic-Level Actions and Consequences
  • 6. CONCLUSION
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY
  • APPENDIX: CONSULTATION